COUSIN CONNECT


There was an error in this gadget

Tuesday, 31 March 2009

Monthly ATC Challenge - 25 Mar 2009


Monthly ATC Challenge - 25 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

the 3rd card with the Spring theme.

Monthly ATC Challenge - 25 Mar 2009


Monthly ATC Challenge - 25 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

The 2nd card with SPRING theme.

Monthly ATC Challenge - 25 Mar 2009


Monthly ATC Challenge - 25 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

This is one of the cards made for the "SPRING" challenge that I mentioned in a previous post.

DECO PAGE - ALTERED BOOK


Before I post my page to Erica in Finland, thought I should scan and add to my site.

Erica is one of my contacts via the Flickr site, and we have traded a few ATC's.
She has recently set up a group of her own, where we were asked to creat 3 Artist Trading Cards with the theme of SPRING.
Separate to that I was invited to join in another art project, which she has titled a DECO - Friendbook and there were 3 rules in making our page:

You must use a cat somehow on the page you create
You must use a word, and mine was PURR
Leave a space on the left hand side of the page.

Once our page was complete, we then had to return to Erica and she will gather all the pages and make into a Friendbook.
When it is done, she will publish each page on her blog (poetboyblog.blogspot.com) and make a lottery where she will select randomly 2 winners who will receive a surprise.

I enjoyed creating my page and here it is:

Tuesday, 24 March 2009

CHINESE SYMBOL FOR SPRING

Chinese Symbols spring

I have recently joined a Monthly ATC Challenge, and our first challenge is SPRING.
Most of the people in the challenge live in the Northern Hemisphere, so we have been given the layout. Cards should include the colours yellow, green & blue, and we are required to make 3 cards for the month.

Sunday, 22 March 2009

THE NINTH STONE by Kylie Fitzpatrick

Ninth Stone Ninth Stone by Kylie Fitzpatrick


My review


rating: 5 of 5 stars
A good story that has history, murder and mystery as its elements.



an orphan girl, Sarah O'Reilly has disguised herself as a boy so that she can work in a newspaper office. There she meets a young widow, Lily Korechyna, who writes a column for the paper, under another name.

The time period is 1864 and ladies were frowned upon for being "outspoken and independent".

Lily is asked by Lady cynthia Herbert to catalogue her collection of jewels. Lady Cynthia has recently returned from India, where she met with the Maharaja of Benares - and he entrusts her with a number of jewels, so that s special charm can be made.

It would appear that the jewels have a curse on them, as 3 people die, who have come in contact with them (including Lily).

A few years after Lily's death in India, Sarah decides to travel there and come to terms with the past events.


View all my reviews.

Friday, 13 March 2009

WATSON FAMILY HISTORY PAGE 7

 

Over the last couple of days, I have discovered some details about the Italians in South Wales, and it would appear that between 1871 and 1901 more than 80% of Italians who emigrated to England and Wales were from northern Italy.
Initially most of them came to London, particularly to Clerkenwell and Holborn, which became known as "Little Italy", where they set up their own schools, church and hospital. In 1900, nearly a thousand of them were selling ice-cream from carts.

I was interested in this story, as Benedetto GARGARO, has his occupation listed on the 1901 Census as Ice Cream Maker, and even his death certificate shows him as a Retired Ice Cream Maker (that was in 1948).
My mother had thought that Benedetto may have come from around Sicily, as other family members had mentioned this area, but now I am having second thoughts.

Anyway, other details from the COMENIUS PROJECT in Wales, state that:

There is no firm evidence to suggest why the people of Bardi chose Wales Wales as an emigration destination, other than it seems that different towns and villages in Italy tended to migrate to "twin" with certain areas.
No doubt they heard of the industrial and commercial boom in South Wales and decided to take their chance.

Initially London was their preferred destination. 28 organ grinders left for London in 1843-44.

I have often wondered how the Italians emigrated to England and Wales. An old photo that is on the site for the comenius Project - Blaengwawr Comprehensive School, shows the market place in Bardi in 1906, with the bus that took them to the railway that marked the first stage of their journey to Wales.

Did the train then take them to the nearest port, from where they boarded a ship that took them to London?
How did they get from London to Wales/South Wales - train or boat?

So many questions and few answers.
Posted by Picasa

WATSON FAMILY HISTORY PAGE 6

 

The photo was taken, I think in the late 1980's, at a family picnic.
Posted by Picasa

WATSON FAMILY HISTORY

 


This is a sort of lead into the family story - some of the facts I have verified from documents, and family sources.
Others are an assumption on my part.
Maybe along the way, I may discover more about the family.
Posted by Picasa

Old Movies - 11 Mar 2009


Old Movies - 11 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

Mr Cool Cat - 11 Mar 2009


Mr Cool Cat - 11 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

This is another one that came together quite by chance.

Artistic Buddha - 12 Mar 2009


Artistic Buddha - 12 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

Double Trouble - 12 Mar 2009


Double Trouble - 12 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

The old and the new - Katharine Hepburn on the left and an Elizabethan character to match.

Beach Chic - 12 Mar 2009


Beach Chic - 12 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

I really liked the quirky photo and have been waiting for the right words, images to use it with.

Round the Clock Geisha - 13 Mar 2009


Round the Clock Geisha - 13 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

Playtime in the Garden - 12 Mar 2009


Playtime in the Garden - 12 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

Feels good to get back to creating some more Artist Trading Cards . Of course I always include some oriental themed ones as well.

Wednesday, 11 March 2009

WHITE GARDENIA - Belinda Alexander

White Gardenia White Gardenia by Belinda Alexandra


My review


rating: 4 of 5 stars
This story starts in China (Harbin) and then onto Shanghai - the era is WW2 when the White Russians were forced to flee. Anya and her mother are separated, owing to a deal done between the Communists and the Russians. Anya is sent to live with a family in Shanghai, and becomes intrigued with their lifestyle and the nightclub that they run. She marries Dimitri, who is running the club, (she is only 16/17 years of age at the time). But Dimitri deserts her and goes to America and Anya along with other refugees is sent to an island in the Pacific - from there she makes here way to Australia.

At that time, refugees were not greeted kindly by some Australians, but Anya sets her sights on building her future. But she never forgets her mother, and knows that one day, they will be reunited.



When Anya has given up hope, especially after hearing that her mother may have died, a miracle happens by way of a surprise visitor from the past.

The story finds its ending in Russia, where mother and daughter are reunited.


View all my reviews.

Monday, 9 March 2009

WATSON FAMILY BOOK

 


Page 4 - This shows an article on Cardiff Wales, where Mary Ann BARRY was born.

Also the birthplace of Rosina GARGARO, (George Watson's mother).
Posted by Picasa

WATSON FAMILY BOOK

 


Page 3 - showing a map of Ireland, and Benedetto GARGARO married Mary Ann BARRY, whose parents came from Ireland.

The butterfly motif is one that I stitched on my embroidery machine.
Posted by Picasa

WATSON FAMILY BOOK

 



This is the second page - and thought it appropriate that it shows the map of Italy, from where Benedetto GARGARO migrated from.
Posted by Picasa

ALTERED BOOK - WATSON FAMILY HISTORY


Here are the pages so far that I have created for the book on my maternal grandfather's name - WATSON.
The first few pages are by way of an introduction, and once I get a bit more confidence with my artwork, will start branching out a bit more.
The book I am using is an old astronomy book from the Op. Shop.

Sunday, 8 March 2009

ALTERED BOOK - FAMILY HISTORY

There is no time like the present to start on this project, and I know that along the way, other family books are going to be created.
My original idea was to tackle this project, using scrapbooking, but after getting wrapped up in making Artist Trading Cards and collage work, this seems the better option. Plus I have seen Altered Books on various blogs, created by people who are researching their family history and the results speak for themselves.
My friend, Diane, has just finished a book on this theme, and it was wonderful to turn each page and gasp at the images and captions she had used.

First step is deciding on the size of the book that I am going to use - how many pages to allow. I figure that this shouldn't be a problem, as I can always create another book.

Which family name do I start with? As I have researched both my family (COWLEY, DUTTON, WATSON, ADAMS, GARGARO etc). and my husband's (TACK, LUDGATE, BOSWORTH etc. etc.), there are lots to choose from. But I have decided to start with WATSON, which is my maternal grandfather(George Bernard WATSON) and see where the pages take me.

collaged cards 6 March 2009


collaged cards 6 March 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 March 2009


collaged cards 6 March 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 Mar 2009


collaged cards 6 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 Mar 2009


collaged cards 6 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 Mar 2009


collaged cards 6 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 March 2009


collaged cards 6 March 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 Mar 2009


collaged cards 6 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 Mar 2009


collaged cards 6 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

collaged cards 6 Mar 2009


collaged cards 6 Mar 2009
Originally uploaded by emerging artist2008

I had bought a set of blank cards sometime ago, and really enjoyed creating these collages.

Friday, 6 March 2009

BURMESE DAYS by George Orwell

Burmese Days Burmese Days by George Orwell


My review


rating: 1 of 5 stars
I managed to get to page 29, before giving up on this book.

Just didn't have the right feeling for the way it was written and got quite put off by the attitude of the club members who didn't want any natives to join their ranks.

Really showed up the British for what they were in that era of Colonial Rule.


View all my reviews.

THE CAREFUL USE OF COMPLIMENTS by Alexander McCall Smith

The Careful Use of Compliments (Sunday Philosophy Club, Book 4) The Careful Use of Compliments by Alexander McCall Smith


My review


rating: 5 of 5 stars
Another wonderful story featuring Isabel. Don't want to give too much away, but Isabel now has a little boy, Charlie, the father being Daniel (who is much younger than her).

Isabel receives news that she is to be replaced as editor of the "Review of Applied Ethics".

Also a painting comes onto the market, which she would like to buy - but at the auction she is outbid. Now there is a mystery surrounding the artist - did he really commit suicide?

You just sit back and enjoy every page of this book


View all my reviews.

Tuesday, 3 March 2009

PEARL ROSINA COWLEY (NEE WATSON)

Since posting the stories to my blog yesterday, and after speaking again to my long lost cousin on the phone today, I realised that I had asked my mother to write down for me her memories of the 2nd World War.
When Fred and I were talking, he mentioned that his father spoke of the war days, and being in the AMP Building in Brisbane, when General Macarthur was there. My mother had also mentioned this incident as well and I thought I would post her recollections:

"War is a very frightening concept for an adult, but for a 12 year old schoolgirl, it is devasting. Over the next few years I was about to have my mind blown away by the atrocities of war and the devastation of countries and human beings.
The realisation of those times and the inhuman acts that are "war" perpetrated by the Japanese and Germans will be forever etched in my memory. Whatever you read in novels and what even movies you see, believe me it actually did happen.
The Genocide of the Jews was the most inhuman of all.

I can remember reading Ann Frank's book and being brought to tears, and also saw many movies on the war and the French Resistance. They were my idols and if I had been older, there was no way I would not hve been over there with them. They were very brave people.

Then to try and start at the beginning as I remember it - I think my first recolletion was of the "call-up". Thank God I had no older brothers as they assuredly would have been conscripted, but I had 3 uncles and my father.
One uncle was taken in as a cook, another was left to his job, as he and my other uncle and Grandmother were caretakers of the A.M.P. Building in Brisbane.
He was flat footed anyway and they did not want him and the last one, my uncle George was taken in for training.

To me he was the most unlikely one to go for he had a gentle demeanour, and the most unhealthy. But that deal soul was sent to New Guinea for the duration of the war. It wrote to him many times, pouring out as much love as you can in a letter, for his wife died in child birth, and I felt it was up to me to lift his spirits. He lived in a tent in that mosquito infested rain-forest with snakes abounding, with malaria and the knowledge that there were Japanese very near at all times.

They determined that my father would be best placed at the aerodrome at Archerfield. He stayed there for the remainder of the war, working on the planes.

In this time with men being shipped away, the women had to take over and man the factories and the munitions. Nothing was made from steel and rubber. These all went to the war effort.
They drove ambulances and transports; they all worked for the same reason - to manufacture and support Australia and the troops that were fighting. Many women joined up in the Forces and became nurses, sailors, drivers, ambulance drivers for the front lines, mechanics and tea ladies. Many worked in secret surroundings with telecommunications. This went on 24 hours a day and some of the centres were top secret. One I found out later was in a garage.
Even my grandmother worked at sorting clothes parcels 2-3 days a week. Remember that the men had all been taken away, some leaving families behind. Themother had to go to work to help support the children. These clothes parcels were one effort to try to help families because there was very little you could buy. Women stepped into their new role without hesitation.

My mother worked in the neighbourhood fruit and cake shop and continued to do so after the war. There were not enough men to man all of the shops.

During this time, food was rationed and everyone had coupons for meat and butter. You had to make do for there was a shortage of everything. Absolutely everything went to the war effort.
You could not buy most things, not even a pair of sandshoes or a basket ball. My grandmother managed to procure me an old pair of sandshoes through the clothes sorting where she worked. They had holes in both the soles, but I can still remember them as being my prized possession and had to continually place cardborad cut-uts in the bottom of the shoes. I wore them for the continuance of the war and was proud of them.

Many a meal consisted of bread and dripping with salt, depending on the flavour of the dripping. We became quite accustomed to this. We had blackouts of course, and had blankets up to all the windors. No home could show any lights in case of an air-raid. They had air-raid wardens on patrol all the time. Air-raid shelters were built in different locations for the residents and my school had trenches dug around the perimeter of the playing fields. We had air-raid drill at school and when the alarm went, we had to go to our place in the trenches. Mymother had decided that she would rather me be with her and my family in case we had a bombing, so I had to come home when and if an air-raid eventuated. One day there was an air-raid and I had to run 4 1/2 blocks home. It was one of the most frightening times of my life, as I was the only person on the road - everyone was in shelters. As all I could think about ws that at any moment, the Japanese would be flying overhead and I would be a good target.
But I reached the shelter completely out of breath, and it was a false alarm.
Many people built their own personal shelters in their backyards. My uncle was one of them. He dug deep into the back yard and covered it with cement. He stock-piled tin food and water and kerosene lamps, blankets and emergency items. But thankfully it was never used.

Now in this time with Australia very vulnerable, and very little protection, America sent forces here to protect us. There was quite a large contingent, and many were stationed quite near to us at New Farm. We lived in Sydney Street, and opposite the park. Near the park there were large sheds, I think they were motor body works. Here they were billeted and their fleet was positioned all along the river.
There came a time when there was a U-Boat in the Brisbane River and residents like us, who were close to the area, were asked to leave. We moved to Clayfield as a precaution and stayed 12 months, before we came back to our beloved New Farm.

The American soldiers were never any trouble. They were always impeccably dressed and very well mannered. They were just young boys, lonely and a long way from home.
They used to spend a lot of time with the family next door and even with the houses quite close, Icannot remember that they were ever very noisy or out of hand. They used to give me boxes of sweets whenever I saw them. There was never any fear when my girlfriends and myself walked home from the movies, and the area was always peaceful.

They used to play baseball on the oval in the park every Sunday and this attracted crowds. The residents loved it and they always had a smile for the American boys, for they were very well behaved. Their General Macarthur had his offices in the AMP Building. In fact they took over the whole building. My grandmother and uncle still stayed there as caretakers.
There were armed guards on the doors and you had to have a pass to get in. I used to go in by the side door in Edward Street and many the time I drove General Macarthur upto his floor in the left, when I ws going to the top to see my grandmother. In those days, the lifts were manual.

Remembering now those days at New Farm - Sunday was a busy day in the Park. What with the baseball and the military band playing in the rose garden - the whole park was always packed and never lacked colour. It was certainly the place to be on a Sunday.

When the atomic bomb ws dropped on Hiroshima, we saw it on the news at the picture theature, but being a child, I only thought of the fact that it was over and didn't in those days, think of the repercussions for the Japanese people. Later on, watching the newsreel at the cinema, it dawned on me what a cataclysmic event it must have been. (there was no T.V in those days). All news was shown at the cinema, before the movie of the night.

There were many more parades in those days. But the one through Queen Street when war was declared over was something to be seen. Everyone turned out and I have never seen so many streamers and balloons. I had a front row seat on the sill of the 1st floor of the AMP Building, which by this time was empty"

The people that Mum spoke of, are the ones in my previous posts. Her grandmother being Lillian Adams, the uncle who went to war, was George Greig.

Monday, 2 March 2009

LILLIAN'S PHOTOS



One photo shows Lillian with her nephew George (born 5 Dec 1938).
His parents were George Murray GREIG and Gladys Irene DUTTON. Sadly Gladys died at a young age 5th December 1938 (at the birth of George)Only 28 years old.

Ironically, George Greig's occupation was also a cleaner (like Frederick Dutton), and George worked in the AMP building in Brisbane.

The second photo is of Lillian (on the left) and Rosina SMITH (my grandfather's mother) and the occasion was my mother's wedding at St Patricks Church New Farm Brisbane.

LILLIAN ADAMS




I have been given quite a few old photos by my mother and some are of Lillian.

My childhood memories of her vague and it always felt like a chore when we were children, to visit her and my uncle and his son. They never had their own home, and always rented. Last place I recall was on Waterworks Road and whenever I passed by the house in later years, always remembered them.
Lillian passed away 31 May 1977 and how I wish that I could have or had the inclination to ask questions of her family background. Her parents were Clarence Thomas ADAMS and Elizabeth GALLAGHER.

Clarence's parents were William ADAMS and Sarah Jane LINSLEY (William was a convict transported from Norfolk England, and Sarah was the child of convicts).

The photos show my mother as a baby (probably 20 months); Mum (Pearl Rosina) at New Farm park rose garden, taken by her grandmother, Rosina.
The group of ladies is - Gladys Irene; Doris May (my grandmother); Lillian who is holding my mother Pearl.

Frederick Richard DUTTON and Emma Elizabeth DOUGALL

Following on from the previous post, Frederick and Emma had 3 children, and like his father, he died at a relatively young age (44 years).
The children were in their teens at this time:

Joan Shirley - 18 years
Frederick Richard - 16 years
Marjorie Loretta - 14 years

The year was 1952 - cause of death Coronary occlusion/coronary insufficiency.
Not knowing any of my mother's family has led to me only having details gleaned from indexes and war records. So I know that in 1936, Frederick & Emma were listed on the Queensland Electoral Roll for the district of Brisbane, sub district Fortitude Valley and were residing at 2 Helen Street TENERIFFE. Frederick's occupation was listed as Cleaner. (death certificate shows the same occupation).

He enlisted in the Australian Army for WW2 (Service No. Q153191) and the date of enlistment is shown as 15 May 1942 at the Valley. Date of Discharge was 10 Feb 1947 and he had the rank of Sergeant.

I often wondered whether there was a genetic health problem with some of the Dutton males, for them to die at a young age.

At this stage I have no family photos of either Frederick or Emma.

RICHARD DUTTON and LILLIAN ADAMS



I thought it appropriate that I continue with adding some family details and photos in relation to my family research. This was prompted by receiving a phone call, out of the blue as the saying goes, from a second cousin on my mother's side.
Family name is DUTTON, and this person is the grandson of Frederick Richard DUTTON and Emma Elizabeth DOUGALL, who were married in Fortitude Valley Brisbane on the 22 Oct 1932. Frederick Richard was the son of Richard DUTTON and Lillian ADAM (my grandparents also).
My research came to a halt, after the marriage of Frederick and Emma, as all I knew were the names of their children - Joan Shirley, Frederick Richard and Marjorie Loretta.
Now I know that Frederick Richard married, had 5 children, and his son Fred was my contact today.
Have sent off family details to him, and phoned my mother, who was excited as well, and she can remember (Frederick)Richard from many years ago.

Patience is a virtue with family research - eventually information comes to light, contact is made and I am ready to hit the Ancestry site and others once again.

Back to the great grandparents (Richard and Lillian).
Richard was born 9th February 1886 at Spring Hill Brisbane (parents Frederick James DUTTON and Margaret COSGROVE).
He married Lillian ADAMS 23 Nov 1907 Milton Brisbane and at the time of his marriage, he was a Wicker Worker, aged 20 and Lillian was aged 18.
They had 4 children:
Frederick Richard - 2 June 1908 (died 17 Dec 1952)
Gladys Irene - 16 Feb 1910 (died 5 Dec 1938)
Doris May - 3 Feb 1915 (died 4 Apr 1980) - my grandmother
Leonard Henry -0 1916 (died 1989)

Richard died at 37 years of age on the 17 Oct 1923 of Pulmonary tuberculosis and I seem to recall that some of the children were sent to live with other people after this, as Lillian could not look after them. The childrens ages at that time ranged from 15 down to 6 years.

The photos above are of Richard DUTTON and his gravestone which is in the Toowong cemetery Brisbane.

Will continue in further posts.